There is always something happening at The First Avenue Playhouse!

In October  -

 

"Harvey"

 

Directed by

Donna Jeanne

When Elwood P. Dowd starts to introduce his imaginary friend Harvey, a six and a half foot rabbit, to guests at a dinner party, his sister, Veta, has seen as much of his eccentric behavior as she can tolerate. She decides to have him committed to a sanitarium to spare her daughter, Myrtle Mae, and their family, from future embarrassment. Problems arise, however, when Veta herself is mistakenly assumed to be on the fringe of lunacy when she explains to doctors that years of living with Elwood's hallucination have caused her to see Harvey also! The doctors commit Veta instead of Elwood, but when the truth comes out, the search is on for Elwood and his invisible companion. When he shows up at the sanitarium looking for his lost friend Harvey it seems that the mild-mannered Elwood's delusion has had a strange influence on more than one of the doctors. Only at the end does Veta realize that maybe Harvey isn't so bad after all.

In November  -

 

"Italian American Reconciliation"

 

Directed by

Dave McGrath

Huey Maximilian Bonfigliano has a problem: While he is safely divorced from his shrewish first wife, Janice, who shot his dog and even took a bead on him, he feels he cannot regain his "manhood" until he woos and wins her one more time—if only to put his broken marriage behind him once and for all. He enlists the aid of his lifelong buddy, Aldo Scalicki, a confirmed bachelor who tries, without apparent success, to convince Huey that he would be better off sticking with his new lady friend, Teresa, a usually placid young waitress whose indignation flares when she learns what Huey is up to. In a moonlit balcony scene (hilariously reminiscent of Cyrano de Bergerac) Aldo pleads his lovesick friend's case and, to his astonishment, Janice capitulates—although not for long. However we do learn that her earlier abuse of Huey was intended to make him "act like a man" which, at last, he does. And, more than that, he (and the audience) become aware that, in the final essence, "the greatest—and only—success is to be able to love"—a truth which emerges delightfully from the heartwarming, wonderfully antic and always imaginatively conceived action of the play.

In December  -

 

"I Do Love the Holidays (Sometimes)"

 

Directed by

Leslie Hochman

What drives you crazy during the holidays? Is it the endless holiday music? Is it that the holiday sales start way too early? Maybe it's having to deal with the loud mouth relatives. Whatever is your personal gripes, "I Do Love The Holidays(sometimes) will be great therapy for what ails you through humor and song. Follow three couples as they deal with all the preparations needed to make the perfect holiday and maybe even answer that very important question "Is there a Santa Claus?". So join us for a family friendly musical that will guarantee to put a smile on your face.

In January  -

 

"Men Are Dogs"

 

 by

Joe Simonelli.

Cecelia is a successful psychologist who, among many sessions, runs a support group for singe and divorced women. She's got troubles of her own, but it's her ensemble of neurotic patients who provide the action when a "volunteer" role-player becomes the hapless victim of their not-inconsiderable ire.

REVIEWS

"Audiences are doubling up with laughter." - Asbury Park Press. Simonelli displays an adept comic touch . . . the mock therapy sessions are worth the price of admission." - Scene OnStage"A fascinating comedy, Mr. Simonelli certainly has a tape recorder on the world...go see it now!" - Joe Franklin, Bloomberg Radio

In February  -

 

"Under the Yum Yum Trees"

 

 by

Lawrence Roman.

Hogan is the landlord of an apartment block in the Telegraph Hill section of San Francisco. He only rents rooms to gorgeous single women at just $75 a month. He is also a master con-man and a bachelor who’s one goal is to seduce the women to whom he rents the apartments.

 Irene, a recently divorced tenant, has just concluded a relationship with Hogan. She's moving out of the apartment with the assistance of her friend Charles. It is immediately snapped up by her naive niece, Robin. Hogan is thrilled at the prospect of yet another beautiful tenant to seduce, but is initially unaware that Robin's boyfriend David  is moving in with her—but in a 'platonic' capacity only, to determine their compatibility.

Temptation is naturally there, but Hogan does his best to prevent David and Robin from consummating their relationship. Irene, who has only lately come to realize the extent of Hogan's promiscuity, is determined to prevent him from getting his hands on her niece. Irene confronts him at his barber, and Hogan is self-defensive and self-deluded to comic effect.

 

 


Curtain goes up at 8:30 evenings, 2:30 for Sunday Matinees
Reservations are required and can be made by calling the Playhouse at
732-291-7552


 
General admission includes the show, dessert, coffee and tea with ice water and soft drinks offered at intermission.

 

 

 

 Sunday
General Admission - $25.00
Seniors - $20.00
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With your Entertainment coupon --
 

 

Friday
General Admission - $25.00
Seniors - $20.00
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With your Entertainment coupon --
 

 

Saturday
 
General Admission - $25.00
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Entertainment Book
promotions cannot be used for Saturday performances

 

 

 

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